Frequently Asked Questions

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The Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA) was signed into law in January 2009. This legislation marked a new era in children's coverage by providing states with significant new funding, new programmatic options, and a range of new incentives for covering children through Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Since that time, AHRQ and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have been working together to implement selected provisions of the legislation related to children's health care quality.

AHRQ's authorizing legislation and its Strategic Plan make children one of AHRQ's priority populations. AHRQ's mission for children is consistent with its overall mission: to support, conduct, and disseminate research that improves access to care and the outcomes, quality, cost, and use of health care services. To that end, AHRQ collaborates with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and external experts to fulfill a number of requirements under Title IV of CHIPRA:

Evaluation produced interim findings from each of the five categories of projects undertaken by the 18 States, as well as a number of implementation guides, special innovation features, and spotlights on each State's accomplishments. Those findings can be found at https://www.ahrq.gov/policymakers/chipra/demoeval/index.html.

In 1997, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) launched an initiative to promote evidence-based practice by establishing 12 Evidence-based Practice Centers (EPCs). These EPCs develop evidence reports and technology assessments on topics relevant to clinical, social science/behavioral, economic, and other health care organization and delivery issues.

There are currently 12 Evidence-based Practice Centers funded by AHRQ, based at academic medical centers and research institutions across the US and Canada.

For information about the current participating EPCs, including contact information, go to: the EPC page.

For a database of all EPC evidence-based reports, go to the Search EPC Reports page.

Topic suggestions to the EPC program for a new evidence review can be submitted by the public, such as clinicians, policymakers, and patients. Organizations, such as healthcare organizations, professional societies, and others, may also suggest topics.

To submit a topic nomination, go to: Submit a Suggestion for a New Evidence Review.

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) launched an initiative to promote evidence-based practice in 1997 by establishing 12 Evidence-based Practice Centers (EPCs) in universities and health-care related organizations. In 2014, AHRQ awarded 5-year contracts for EPC-V to 13 Evidence-based Practice Centers to continue this work. These EPCs develop evidence reports and technology assessments on topics relevant to clinical, social science/behavioral, economic, and other health care organization and delivery issues. These reports may be used for informing and developing coverage decisions, quality measures, educational materials and tools, clinical practice guidelines, and research agendas. The EPCs also conduct research on methodology of evidence synthesis.

With this program, AHRQ is a "science partner" with private and public organizations in their efforts to improve the quality, effectiveness, and appropriateness of health care by providing high- quality, unbiased syntheses of the evidence and facilitating the translation of evidence-based research findings.

For more information on the EPC program and participating Centers, go to the EPC Overview.

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) ceased to publish guidelines in 1996. Most of the existing guidelines were withdrawn from distribution as out of date in 2000.

The outdated guidelines are archived online at the National Library of Medicine. You can access them via the AHRQ Archive.

Please be aware that the information in these guidelines is no longer considered current for medical practice.

All acceptable activities must be undertaken for periods that average at least 20 hours per week. Total employment in such activities averaging less than 20 hours per week cannot be counted toward fulfilling the obligation except in cases of disability or other pressing personal or family circumstances, such as child care or elder care responsibilities. Individuals otherwise engaged in full-time employment may not engage in service payback activities at effort levels below 20 hours per week. If less than 20 hours commitment per week is permitted, the total period of service obligation will be prorated.

TalkingQuality is a comprehensive resource and guide for organizations that produce and disseminate reports to consumers on the quality of care provided by health care organizations (e.g., hospitals, health plans, medical groups, nursing homes) and individual physicians. The purpose of TalkingQuality is to improve consumer reports on health care quality.

TalkingQuality offers:

  • Innovative ideas for communicating complex information on health care quality to consumers.
  • Information on the latest research findings.
  • Real-world examples to illustrate various approaches and concepts.

For details, go to: https://www.ahrq.gov/talkingquality/.



Ask a question, report a problem, or give us your opinion about a specific AHRQ program.